02/17/2013

Joining the Moot Court Board

Moot Court Board Plank

Click here for our criteria for the Lawyering Brief and sample briefs!

The Moot Court Board looks for talented advocates skilled in both the spoken and written word. In particular, MCB looks for students whose personal experiences and skills will enrich their ability to produce top-quality problems and compete successfully in moot court competitions.

Prospective members can find out more about the journal from our info sheet and frequently asked questions packs. Our staff members are selected on the basis of their performance in the NYU Journal Writing Competition, but submit their capstone Lawyering (or, if a Transfer, 1L Legal Writing) brief in place of the comment required by other journals.

The Board selects precisely 42 students, usually 38 1Ls and 4 transfer students, to join the organization each year. All our incoming Staff Editors ranked us as their #1 or #2 choice in the Journal Matching System, making us one of the most popular (and competitive) journals at NYU Law. Since MCB members are selected on the same basis as the other NYU academic journals, neither 1Ls nor LLMs can be members of the Moot Court Board (except by participating in the Jessup Competition).

In the best tradition of our nation’s highest court, selection for the MCB is done on the basis of a multi-factor balancing test incorporating:

1. Lawyering Brief: Students apply to MCB through the journal write-on competition but submit their Lawyering Brief from Spring in place of the Comment requested by the other journals. The Lawyering brief is the most important single element in selection. It is assessed for technical accuracy (Bluebooking, grammar, etc.), use of authorities, logical organization, creativity, and style. You can find exemplar briefs and our scoring criterion here.

2. The journal competition Bluebooking Test is required of MCB applicants and is considered separately from students’ Lawyering Brief.

3. A student’s GPA is considered, although with a lower weight than the Lawyering Brief and other components.

4. Each applicant must submit a resume in the approved NYU format, including any relevant experience in written or oral advocacy (debating, mock trial, brief-writing, etc.).

5. Like all journals and most employers, the Moot Court Board looks for personal statements (which should be attached to the resume) that tells a compelling story of who the applicant is, and how their identity, experience, or interests led them to apply to the Moot Court Board.

If you have any questions about joining the Moot Court Board, please feel free to contact us!